Walther's King

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph E. Walther began 99.9 % of chess games by moving his King's Pawn foward 2 spaces... Depending on the opponent's response he'd oft pull his King's Bishop out to his Queen's Bishop's 4 space, if the opponent is not familiar with chess he would continue by moving his Queen to further advance on the opponent's King's Bishop's Pawn, the next move would be Mate if the opponent did not guard themself...

If the opponent has protected King's Bishop's Pawn, Joe Walther would continue with an array of srategies, usually battering away at the opposing side. Patience being one of his strong suits, "The Best Defense is a Strong Offense," he frequently remarked. If ever a move resulted in loss, he mused "I See, Said the Blind Man."

Chess is an ephemeral, forward momentum, strategical game, therefore it is essential to use Pawns with great ingenuity... Dr. Walther prepared them for the race during the end game. He usually planned for a replacement or second Queen. Normally he took out his King's Knight early in the game to allow for a King's Rook "Castle Manuever." On occasion he conducted a Queen's Rook "Castle" but much less often. He used his Knight for many piece exchanges by putting the Black King in Check then hopping over and taking out the defenseless Rook, Bishop, Pawn or even an unsuspecting Queen...

During the game each and every piece of his was in a very guarded network. Any pressure by the opponent would yield a characteristic remark, such as "The Whole Town is Under Water," or "This is a Sticky Wicket," "What a Picklement," "It's Time to Retreat," his next move would then dodge imminent danger. However, Joe Walther saw the game at least 10 moves in advance...

Once familiar with the game and able to build a stable defense, the only thing left to do is exchange pieces, try to keep it even, exploit any possible weakness to get the edge, however Walther's King was fortified beyond repeal in 99.999% of the games I played him allowing for that ever so confident "I think I can do this with Impunity," about 10 moves before a Check-Mate...

Although the pace of the game was casual, giving enough time for thoughtfulness, if the opponent ever were to take too long a "My grandmother was slow, but she was 102," was in order... Research has yielded that neither Esta Cook or Louisa Null lived quite that long, but Great-Aunt Annie (Walther) Mason lived to 103, so that counts.

 

 

Playing Chess 2003 (Video)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


im·pu·ni·ty

(exemption or freedom from punishment, harm, or loss)